Webinar recording - Coronavirus: Getting back to the new normal

In this webinar, the speakers give their very different perspectives on what is happening in their countries right now and how employers can best manage their workforces in the circumstances. In this webinar, four Ius Laboris employment law firms provide their very different perspectives on what is happening in their countries right now and how employers can best manage their workforces in the circumstances. Topics include how to manage…

Restructuring the workplace post Covid-19: FAQs for employers in the UK

This article tackles key questions for employers around restructuring as they start to contemplate the end of subsidised furlough in the UK. The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme may have been extended to 31 October 2020, but employers should be thinking now about what their workforce might look like following the end of subsidised furlough and a return to more normal working patterns. We set out…

Sickness and sick pay: FAQs for employers in the UK as lockdown restrictions ease

This article tackles some of the most frequently asked questions about sickness absence and sick pay during the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic as the UK Government sets out the ‘roadmap’ for easing lockdown. The government has set out its ‘roadmap’ for gradually easing the lockdown restrictions, but as employees begin to return to work there will continue to be many individuals who are unwell or required…

Employment status: the European Court clarifies who counts as a worker under EU law in gig economy ruling

The European Court of Justice has ruled that it’s up to national courts to make decisions about employment status, but that a courier working for Yodel in the UK appeared to them to have been correctly classified as self-employed, given the latitude he had over accepting jobs, working for competitors, providing substitutes and deciding his work schedule. The crucial factors were independence and subordination. Background…

Brexit: what are the consequences for employers?

Following the UK’s departure from the EU on 31 January 2020, this article asks what this means for employers in the transition period and beyond. On 31 January 2020, the United Kingdom left the EU following ratification of the withdrawal agreement. Now begins a transitional period, lasting until 31 December 2020, during which European Union law continues to apply. This period can be extended once…

What a Conservative Government means for UK immigration law

What will the new Conservative government mean for immigration law and policy in the UK? Having fought his campaign on the promise to ‘get Brexit done’ it is now certain that Mr Johnson will take the UK out of the EU. With a 78-seat majority, Mr Johnson plans to bring his Withdrawal Agreement Bill back to the commons next Friday and pave the way for…

No-Deal Brexit - Update: Residence and labour market access for UK citizens in Germany

With the re-election of a conservative majority in the UK Parliament, UK citizens – and their employers – continue to face the question to which extent they will be allowed to reside and work in Germany after a „No-Deal Brexit”, i.e. after a withdrawal of the UK from the EU without an agreement regulating the legal modalities of the withdrawal, on the new Brexit date…

UK - Something to be-leave in? Brexit as a philosophical belief

There are strong feelings on either side of the Brexit debate, with people passionately arguing for both leave and remain. What issues arise if a supporter brings their views into the workplace? Are there potential discrimination risks? Could ‘Brexit’, or an equally strong belief in ‘remain’, count as a philosophical belief for the purposes of the Equality Act 2010 (‘EqA’)? The legal test for a…

UK – employment rights in a no-deal Brexit

What might a ‘no-deal’ Brexit mean for UK employment rights? What could employers do now to prepare? And what might the future hold in a no-deal scenario? With new Prime Minister Boris Johnson clear that he would be prepared to leave the EU without a deal if necessary and current legislation committing the UK to leaving the EU at 23:00 on 31 October, this article revisits the employment law implications of a no-deal Brexit.  What could employers do now to…

UK – European Court of Justice rules that employers must keep records of actual time worked

The European Court of Justice has ruled that employers must keep a record of all hours worked by their workers each day, in order to ensure compliance with the rules on maximum weekly working time and rest breaks. The EU Working Time Directive (‘WTD’) limits maximum weekly working time to 48 hours a week, and gives workers the right to daily and weekly rest breaks….